Planets of the solar system

The number of planets in the Solar System is 8, and they are classified in order of distance from the Sun:

 

The inner planets or planets of the terrestrial group are Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. They consist mainly of silicates and metals

The outer planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune – are the so-called gas giants. They are much more massive than the terrestrial planets. The largest planets of the solar system, Jupiter and Saturn, consist mainly of hydrogen and helium; smaller gas giants, Uranus and Neptune, in addition to hydrogen and helium, contain methane and carbon monoxide in their atmospheres.

 

Planets of the Solar System and their arrangement in order

 

The solar system is a planetary system that includes the central star-the Sun-and all the natural objects of the cosmos that revolve around it. It was formed by gravitational compression of the gas-dust cloud about 4.57 billion years ago. We learn which planets are part of the solar system, how they are relative to the Sun and their brief characteristics.

 

Brief information about the planets of the solar system

 

The number of planets in the Solar System is 8, and they are classified in order of distance from the Sun:

The inner planets or planets of the terrestrial group are Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. They consist mainly of silicates and metals

The outer planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune – are the so-called gas giants. They are much more massive than the terrestrial planets. The largest planets of the solar system, Jupiter and Saturn, consist mainly of hydrogen and helium; smaller gas giants, Uranus and Neptune, in addition to hydrogen and helium, contain methane and carbon monoxide in their atmospheres.

The list of planets of the Solar System in order from the Sun looks like this: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Enumerating the planets from the largest to the smaller, this order is changing. The largest planet is Jupiter, followed by Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Earth, Venus, Mars and, finally, Mercury.

All planets revolve around the Sun in one direction with the rotation of the Sun (counter-clockwise, if viewed from the North Pole of the Sun).

Most of the planets rotate around their axis in the same direction that it orbits the Sun. Exceptions are Venus and Uranus, and Uranus rotates almost “lying on its side” (the inclination of the axis is about 90 degrees).

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